5 – How should I make audio available on my website?

Promoting your music through a website is all about striking a balance between supplying the needs of the customer/consumer/listener/fan and retaining your rights.

First of all, ask yourself some questions

1 – Do you hold the rights to the music?  If not, then you must seek permission to stream or otherwise make available the audio by contacting MCPS for a licence. 

2 – Is the music original?  Still, you must ascertain if you have the permission of the performers to disseminate the track.  If you paid them for the session and they signed a waiver, then you may well be okay.  If in doubt, seek permission first.  It’s all about communication.

So, you have permission of the rights holders to use the track – how to proceed?

If you make the track freely available, then be aware of what the possible consequences may be.  It is very hip to suggest that you give away everything, but this is only suggested by people who produce no music of their own.  You may wish to give away one complete track and stream the rest.  You could stream everything or make a compilation track available.

Which model you use is up to you, the important thing is to be aware of the different options and what each one means to you as a creative artist.

If you employ effective methods for user feedback, this will tell you whether or not your chosen model of offering audio dissemination is any good.

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4 Comments

  1. […] 5 – How should I make audio available on my website? Promoting your music through a website is all about striking a balance between supplying the needs of the customer/consumer/listener/fan and retaining your rights. First of all, ask yourself some questions … […]

  2. It is very hip to suggest that you give away everything, but this is only suggested by people who produce no music of their own.

    Right. Like Trent Reznor, Radiohead, Girl Talk, Kid Rock, Dispatch…

    You may wish to give away one complete track and stream the rest. You could stream everything or make a compilation track available.

    You understand that anyone can record a stream right? The only real difference between a stream and a download is user consciousness and the location of the file on your computer. A stream just downloads the files into a temporary files directory.

    If you’re afraid of giving music away (since only people who don’t create music do that…), you should be afraid of streaming.

  3. Blaise wrote: You understand that anyone can record a stream right? The only real difference between a stream and a download is user consciousness and the location of the file on your computer. A stream just downloads the files into a temporary files directory.

    Music Insight replies: Yes, it is also possible to steal any car, but things like scruples or fear of detection or principles might kick in if it is more difficult than just one or two clicks. Streaming offers people a chance to hear and like before they buy. Radiohead is an interesting example as they saw beyond the chain of ‘write material, sell material’. They captured precious marketing information that was worth more potentially than revenue from album sales. They also ensured that they had fans inside their store looking around at the other things they had for sale.

    Some of the most voracious proponents of giving away music are those who don’t have a back catalogue to exploit. It is hoped that artists who choose to give away material are aware of the potential consequences of their actions.

  4. Yes, it is also possible to steal any car, but things like scruples or fear of detection or principles might kick in if it is more difficult than just one or two clicks

    Maybe I wasn’t clear. If I click ‘play’ on a website (to stream), the file is downloaded on my computer into the /tmp directory. If I instead click ‘download’, it gets downloaded into a directory of my choice. No matter what, I need to download a song to play it on my computer. Streaming doesn’t really avoid the “consequences” of downloading, it just obscures them a little. It doesn’t prevent anyone from saving a copy of a song, it’s just a little less obvious how to go about doing so.

    Some of the most voracious proponents of giving away music are those who don’t have a back catalogue to exploit.

    Those without a back catalogue are likely to be much less dependent on copyright and to be much less limited in their thinking by it as well, so they tend to be more open to other business models that don’t depend on copyright. I think that’s a good thing.

    It is hoped that artists who choose to give away material are aware of the potential consequences of their actions.

    I’m in agreement here, though we probably have different views on the consequences.

    Surely though, we can agree that your original jab was a bit of an overstatement and a little misleading: “It is very hip to suggest that you give away everything, but this is only suggested by people who produce no music of their own.”


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